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Home Beekeeping

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Kitchen Garden Store

Learn to preserve the produce you grow in your home kitchen garden. This home canning starter kit includes everything you need to can your first batch using the boiling water bath method for high-acid foods. Find it and other canning supplies at the Home Kitchen Garden Store.

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Basil will grow happily for you during winter in a pot in your house. When you plant any herbs or vegetables from seed indoors, use commercial potting soil. Bringing soil inside from your yard or garden risks introducing pests that may attack established house plants.

If you have a home kitchen garden in the norther hemisphere, you may be putting it to bed for the winter. At least those of us who live in hardiness zones 8, 7, 6, 5, and lower are dealing with (or have already dealt with) this unhappy truth. But winter is no reason to suspend gardening altogether. Rather, winter provides opportunity to manage simple gardening projects with relatively large returns.

If you don’t yet have a home kitchen garden, don’t put it off until spring. Start now and within four-to-six weeks, you can start harvesting tasty homegrown herbs and vegetables that will help keep you pumped for spring planting.

A Home Kitchen Garden Indoors

There are plenty of herbs and small vegetables that are happy to grow indoors. I poked around for a bit, looking for a good instructional video explaining how to set up an indoor planter. Sadly, most of the videos I could find on the subject started with established potted plants. At this time of year, you’re more likely to be working with seeds.

With that in mind, if you’d like step-by-step instructions for planting herbs in a flower pot, please check out the article, A Very Small Kitchen Garden: Basil that I wrote in August of 2008. My intent with that article was to provide enough detail that even someone who had never before planted anything would be able to muddle through.

Simplicity Overkill

While searching for the perfect instructional video, I came across a thinly-veiled advertorial for a seed company in Maine. This company packages seeds sandwiched between sheets of biodegradable paper. You toss the seed sandwich into a flower pot with soil, water it, and you’ll soon have a small home kitchen garden.

At first, I thought, “silly.” Then I thought it was a good idea for less experienced gardeners who want minimal bother… but it would probably be crazy more expensive than buying seed packs and planting them more traditionally.

So, I hopped over to the web site mentioned in the video and found the seed packs aren’t unbearably overpriced. True, you’d get more seeds for the same money if you bought traditional packets, but that’s no bargain if you use them to plant a single flower pot during the winter. What’s more, this seed company, Johnny’s Selected Seeds, offers a special deal: six “seed disks” (that’s six varieties of seeds), six flower pots, and six saucers for $10.95… a very good price for a sizeable indoor herb garden. Here’s the rub: these sets are back-ordered through late November!

Have a look at the video. It’s a simple idea that certainly has a place for beginning home kitchen gardeners. And, if you happen to buy anything from Johnny, please let them know you heard about them from http://www.homekitchengarden.com. Thanks!

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3 Responses to Indoor Home Kitchen Garden

  • Joan Weytze says:

    Great idea. I’d been thinking of doing some container gardening, which would supplement my garden plot. More room for goodies.

  • Trish Lewis says:

    I hope you do more indoor gardening for those of us who are in cities and in apartments and container/small/indoor is all we have but we don’t know how…THANKS!

  • admin says:

    Trish: Thanks for your suggestion. I will revisit indoor kitchen gardening from time-to-time, but not a whole lot on this site. On the other hand, I have another blog specifically about gardening in limited spaces. Granted, it strays into some fairly large issues (such as planting and managing fruit trees), but it always gravitates back to small kitchen gardens.

    I have a few indoor projects in mind for that blog to run in the next several weeks. In fact, I’ve done the photos (and I shot a video, but I don’t know whether I like it) that will be the basis for an upcoming post on planting and growing herbs on a windowsill… though right now I’m talking about building outdoor planting beds, and will soon be planting fruit trees.

    That said, please visit Your Small Kitchen Garden for information that’s more specific to gardeners with limited space.

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